Alan November’s transformational six

Alan November’s 23 January 2017 post, Crafting a vision for empowered learning and teaching: beyond the $1000 pencil, in his blog November Learning reminded me of his invaluable and powerful six transformational questions.   What great learning could occur if every assessment was built on this foundation!  What wonderful critical thinking, communication and collaboration skills could be learned!

  1. Did the assignment build capacity for critical thinking on the web?
  2. Did the assignment develop new lines of inquiry?
  3. Are there opportunities for students to make their thinking visible?
  4. Are there opportunities to broaden the perspective of the conversation with authentic audiences from around the world?
  5. Is there an opportunity for students to create a contribution (purposeful work)?
  6. Does the assignment demo “best in the world” examples of content and skill?

Snippets from holiday browsing

The summer break is over!  Reality returns!  So what snippets, bits and pieces crossed my path over this glorious break?

Edsurge asks  “Has your School reached an edtech plateau?” suggesting several ways to “move the needle” for administrators, teachers, parents.  There is nothing new here, but common sense for those wanting to lift the game.

Here comes yet another Top 10 list. Edsurge publishes its Top 10 S’Cool tools of 2016.  (Love the S’Cool name!) Most of them have not previously been on my radar.

Education HQ caught my attention today with Lesson idea: get students cracking with codes.  The Caesar cypher, Morse code and the Enigma Machine are explained as reasons to start discussing and playing with codes (not necessarily coding).

An ABC Splash email reminded  me of the wonderful classroom resources available to both primary and secondary teachers.

For those interested in perspectives from countries other than Australia, NFER (National Foundation for Educational Research, UK) has posted a list of the hot topics from 2016.  Of interest to me are the blog posts Research in schools: experience and tips from the frontline and The rise of Edu-Twitter: chat, collaboration and CPD.

I’m sure there is more. What have I missed?

SAMR – Ruben Puentedura’s model

Keynote speaker at the AIS IT Management and Leadership Conference in Canberra was Ruben Puentedura, renowned for his SAMR model of technology enhancement and transformation.   It’s good to be reminded of the usefulness of this model!

At the enhancement level:

  • Substitution – where technology is used as a substitution tool with no significant change to the activity
  • Augmentation – technology enhances the activity but there is no significant improvement in the design

At the transformation level:

  • Modification – technology allows the activity to be redesigned and improved
  • Redefinition – the re-creation of new tasks that could not have been done without technology